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Barnard 202,203,204,LDN 1452,VdB 13 and Herbig-Haro targets (Aries-Taurus)
vdB 81, NGC 2254 (Monoceros)
Ced 51, B30,B31, HH 179, HH244 ( Orion)
Vdb130 (Cygnus)
Barnard 145 (Cygnus) 2018
  Starfish M38,Herschel H39-7,Abell PLN9 (Auriga).jpg - Starfish cluster M38, Herschel H39-7, Abell PLN 9 (Auriga)* January 2019 * Telescope CFF 135 (f/6.7 ,930mm ) * ASA DDM85 mount * G3 16200 EC CCD Moravian * Baader LRGB  filter set * L: 375 minutes R: 390m G:360 m B:400m * Subframes acquired unguided (Sequence&Autoslew software)*Starfish Cluster, also known as Messier 38 (or M38). This open star cluster is located in the direction of the northern Auriga constellation, along with the open star clusters M36 and M37. While not the brightest of the three, the location of the Starfish within the polygon formed by the brightest stars of Auriga makes it very easy to find.At a estimated distance of  4200 light years from our solar system, this 220 million year old group of stars spreads itself across about 25 light years of space. If you’re using a telescope, you may have noticed its not alone… Messier 38 might very well be a binary star cluster! As Anil K. Pandey (et al) explained in a 2006 study:“We present CCD photometry in a wide field around two open clusters, NGC 1912(M38) and NGC 1907(Herschel H39-7). The stellar surface density profiles indicate that the radii of the clusters NGC 1912 and NGC 1907 are 14' and 6' respectively. The core of the cluster NGC 1907 is found to be 1'.6±0'.3, whereas the core of the cluster NGC 1912 could not be defined due to its significant variation with the limiting magnitude. The clusters are situated at distances of 1400±100 pc (NGC 1912) and 1760±100 pc (NGC 1907), indicating that in spite of their close locations on the sky they may be formed in different parts of the Galaxy.”Right side of M38 a tiny purple bubble ..it´s the planetary nebula Abell 9.(Credits : Astronomy magazine )However, it was Sang Hyun Lee and See-Woo Lee who gave us the estimates of M38’s distance and age. As they wrote in their 1996 study, “UBV CCD Photometry of Open Cluster NGC 1907 and NGC 1912“: “The distance difference of the two clusters is 300pc and the age difference is 150 Myr. These results imply that the two clusters are not physically connected.”  
 
 
 
 
 

Starfish cluster M38, Herschel H39-7, Abell PLN 9 (Auriga)* January 2019 * Telescope CFF 135 (f/6.7 ,930mm ) * ASA DDM85 mount * G3 16200 EC CCD Moravian * Baader LRGB filter set * L: 375 minutes R: 390m G:360 m B:400m * Subframes acquired unguided (Sequence&Autoslew software)* Starfish Cluster, also known as Messier 38 (or M38). This open star cluster is located in the direction of the northern Auriga constellation, along with the open star clusters M36 and M37. While not the brightest of the three, the location of the Starfish within the polygon formed by the brightest stars of Auriga makes it very easy to find.At a estimated distance of 4200 light years from our solar system, this 220 million year old group of stars spreads itself across about 25 light years of space. If you’re using a telescope, you may have noticed its not alone… Messier 38 might very well be a binary star cluster! As Anil K. Pandey (et al) explained in a 2006 study:“We present CCD photometry in a wide field around two open clusters, NGC 1912(M38) and NGC 1907(Herschel H39-7). The stellar surface density profiles indicate that the radii of the clusters NGC 1912 and NGC 1907 are 14' and 6' respectively. The core of the cluster NGC 1907 is found to be 1'.6±0'.3, whereas the core of the cluster NGC 1912 could not be defined due to its significant variation with the limiting magnitude. The clusters are situated at distances of 1400±100 pc (NGC 1912) and 1760±100 pc (NGC 1907), indicating that in spite of their close locations on the sky they may be formed in different parts of the Galaxy.” Right side of M38 a tiny purple bubble ..it´s the planetary nebula Abell 9. (Credits : Astronomy magazine ) However, it was Sang Hyun Lee and See-Woo Lee who gave us the estimates of M38’s distance and age. As they wrote in their 1996 study, “UBV CCD Photometry of Open Cluster NGC 1907 and NGC 1912“: “The distance difference of the two clusters is 300pc and the age difference is 150 Myr. These results imply that the two clusters are not physically connected.” Download Imagen original
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