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SNR 3C4002,PN G053.1-02.1 (Sagitta)
LDN 1188,DG180 (LBN 496),PGC 97260 (Cepheus)
NGC 654,VdB6,LDN 1332,1334,1337 (Cassiopeia)
DG 181,DG 182, LDN 1175,LDN 1184 (Cepheus)
Barnard 3 (Perseus)
  NGC 3344 (Leo Minor).jpg - NGC 3344 (Leo Minor) * January-February 2015 * ASA N12 astrograph (f/3.6,1078mm) *ADA DDM85 mount * FLI ML8300 at -25ºC * LRGB Optec filter set * L:660m R:180m G:170m B:220m * Unguided * NGC 3344 is a (R)SAB(r)bc galaxy Type.The galaxy features an outer ring swirling around an inner ring with a subtle bar structure in the center. A bar is an elongated distribution of stars and gas in the center of a spiral galaxy. The central regions of the galaxy are predominately populated by young stars, with the galactic fringes also featuring areas of active star formation.Central bars are found in around two thirds of spiral galaxies. NGC 3344’s is clearly visible here, although it is not as dramatic as in some galaxies.The high density of stars in galaxies’ central regions gives them enough gravitational influence to affect the movement of other stars in their galaxy. However, NGC 3344’s outer stars are moving in an unusual manner, although the presence of the bar cannot entirely account for this, leaving astronomers puzzled. It is possible that in its past NGC 3344 passed close by another galaxy and acquired stars from it, but more research is needed to state this with confidence.Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA  
NGC 4151 (Eye of Sauron),NGC 4156 (Canes Venatici)
NGC 5934,5935,5943,5945,5947 (Bootes)
LDN 810,SH2-92,Reflection nebula GN 19.43.3.01, YSO CB205YC1 (Vulpecula-Cygnus)
vdB 136,LBN 312 (Cygnus)
LBN 331,DWB 177,DWB 178,DWB 179, V1488 Cyg (Cygnus)

NGC 3344 (Leo Minor) * January-February 2015 * ASA N12 astrograph (f/3.6,1078mm) *ADA DDM85 mount * FLI ML8300 at -25ºC * LRGB Optec filter set * L:660m R:180m G:170m B:220m * Unguided * NGC 3344 is a (R)SAB(r)bc galaxy Type.The galaxy features an outer ring swirling around an inner ring with a subtle bar structure in the center. A bar is an elongated distribution of stars and gas in the center of a spiral galaxy. The central regions of the galaxy are predominately populated by young stars, with the galactic fringes also featuring areas of active star formation. Central bars are found in around two thirds of spiral galaxies. NGC 3344’s is clearly visible here, although it is not as dramatic as in some galaxies. The high density of stars in galaxies’ central regions gives them enough gravitational influence to affect the movement of other stars in their galaxy. However, NGC 3344’s outer stars are moving in an unusual manner, although the presence of the bar cannot entirely account for this, leaving astronomers puzzled. It is possible that in its past NGC 3344 passed close by another galaxy and acquired stars from it, but more research is needed to state this with confidence. Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA Download Imagen original
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