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IC 4954,4955 (Vulpecula)
SNR 3C4002,PN G053.1-02.1 (Sagitta)
LDN 1188,DG180 (LBN 496),PGC 97260 (Cepheus)
NGC 654,VdB6,LDN 1332,1334,1337 (Cassiopeia)
DG 181,DG 182, LDN 1175,LDN 1184 (Cepheus)
  Barnard 3 (Perseus).jpg - Barnard 3 ( Perseus) * September-October-November 2014 * ASA N12 astrograph (f/3.6,1078mm) * DDM85 mount * FLI ML8300 at -25ºC * LRGB Optec filter set * L:800m R:370m G:360m B:370m * Unguided*This is Barnard 3, a dusty, gassy region of the galaxy about a thousand light years away where young stars are lighting up their neighborhood.Complex molecules similar to soot, called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs. .So what’s going on here? Near the center is a F2 white-yellow star ( HD 278942)  which is brighter and hotter than our Sun, and is flooding the surrounding material with ultraviolet light and a fast wind of subatomic particles (like the Sun’s solar wind, but a whole lot stronger and with a much, much farther reach). This has carved out a gigantic cavity in that stuff, creating a bubble about 25 light years in diameter — that’s huge: 250,000,000,000,000 kilometers across, more than 10,000 times the size of our solar system!The UV from the star is making the gas glow.In optical light (this object is a mess , with gas emitting light, reflecting light, and dust absorbing it. When gas is lit up this way around a star, it’s called a Strömgren sphere, after the astronomer Bengt Strömgren who did the first theoretical work on them.An infrared image of the area can be seen here:http://wise.ssl.berkeley.edu/gallery_Barnard3.htmlCredit: (Phil Plait, Discover Magazine, December 2011)  
NGC 3344 (Leo Minor)
NGC 4151 (Eye of Sauron),NGC 4156 (Canes Venatici)
NGC 5934,5935,5943,5945,5947 (Bootes)
LDN 810,SH2-92,Reflection nebula GN 19.43.3.01, YSO CB205YC1 (Vulpecula-Cygnus)
vdB 136,LBN 312 (Cygnus)

Barnard 3 ( Perseus) * September-October-November 2014 * ASA N12 astrograph (f/3.6,1078mm) * DDM85 mount * FLI ML8300 at -25ºC * LRGB Optec filter set * L:800m R:370m G:360m B:370m * Unguided* This is Barnard 3, a dusty, gassy region of the galaxy about a thousand light years away where young stars are lighting up their neighborhood.Complex molecules similar to soot, called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or PAHs. . So what’s going on here? Near the center is a F2 white-yellow star ( HD 278942) which is brighter and hotter than our Sun, and is flooding the surrounding material with ultraviolet light and a fast wind of subatomic particles (like the Sun’s solar wind, but a whole lot stronger and with a much, much farther reach). This has carved out a gigantic cavity in that stuff, creating a bubble about 25 light years in diameter — that’s huge: 250,000,000,000,000 kilometers across, more than 10,000 times the size of our solar system! The UV from the star is making the gas glow.In optical light (this object is a mess , with gas emitting light, reflecting light, and dust absorbing it. When gas is lit up this way around a star, it’s called a Strömgren sphere, after the astronomer Bengt Strömgren who did the first theoretical work on them. An infrared image of the area can be seen here:http://wise.ssl.berkeley.edu/gallery_Barnard3.html Credit: (Phil Plait, Discover Magazine, December 2011) Download Imagen original
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